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Iran says it dismantled a U.S. cyber espionage network

Mon, 06/17/2019 - 08:04

Iran says it dismantled a U.S. cyber espionage networkIran said on Monday it had exposed a large cyber espionage network it alleged was run by the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), and that several U.S. spies had been arrested in different countries as the result of this action. U.S.-Iran tensions are growing following accusations by U.S. President Donald Trump's administration that Tehran last Thursday attacked two oil tankers in the Gulf of Oman, a vital oil shipping route. Iran denies having any role.


AOC: ‘Hyde Amendment Is about Income Inequality’ Not Abortion

Mon, 06/17/2019 - 07:43

 ‘Hyde Amendment Is about Income Inequality’ Not AbortionRepresentative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D., N.Y.) on Sunday praised former vice president Joe Biden for his recently announced opposition to the Hyde amendment and said that her own opposition to the prohibition on the direct federal funding of abortion is rooted in her concern about income inequality.“I’m encourage by the fact that he is now against the Hyde Amendment,” Ocasio-Cortez told ABC’s Jonathan Karl when asked about Biden’s recent reversal on the issue.Ocasio-Cortez, who launched a petition over the weekend to build public support for the amendment's repeal, went on to explain that the direct federal funding of abortion is necessary to protect the abortion rights of incarcerated pregnant women.“Reproductive health care for incarcerated women should be guaranteed as it is with all women in the United States, so I think it really depends,” said the freshman New York lawmaker. More from her remarks:> And that’s really what the Hyde amendment is really about. The Hyde amendment isn’t about abortion per se. The Hyde amendment is truly about equality of healthcare and healthcare access for low income women and women of color and women that get caught in our mass incarceration system. And so the Hyde amendment is about income inequality and it’s about women’s healthcare in a system of income inequality. So I think that we need to repeal it.After maintaining support for the Hyde amendment throughout his decades-long career in politics, Biden reversed himself last month in response to pressure from abortion-advocacy groups.“If I believe health care is a right, as I do, I can no longer support an amendment that makes that right dependent on someone's ZIP code,” Biden said at a Democratic National Committee gala in Atlanta, citing the restrictive abortion bills recently passed in a number of southern states as the impetus for his reversal.Biden's high-profile reversal on the Hyde amendment prompted an outpouring of public statements from his 2020 Democratic primary opponents about the need to repeal the amendment, which has been added as a rider to federal spending bills in the decades since the 1973 Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision.


New leak may confirm Samsung’s massive Galaxy Note 10 redesign

Mon, 06/17/2019 - 07:17

New leak may confirm Samsung’s massive Galaxy Note 10 redesignIt's still far too early to say for certain whether the Galaxy S10e, Galaxy S10, and Galaxy S10+ have truly been a success for Samsung. The second quarter of 2019 will be the first full quarter of sales for the company's new flagship phones series, so we should find out sometime next month whether the Galaxy S10 series gave Samsung's mobile division the boost it so sorely needed after last year's Galaxy S9 series was a flop. What we can say for certain, however, is that the Galaxy S10 series is a massive step in the right direction for Samsung. While last year's Galaxy S and Galaxy Note flagship phones were uninspired and boring, this year's Galaxy S10 phones finally feature the elegant redesign and all-screen display that Samsung fans have been craving.Thankfully, there's more good news on the way for Samsung fans, and it's much-needed considering the current Galaxy Fold disaster (though we totally warned you more than a year before it was announced that the Galaxy Fold would end up being a piece of junk). It turns out that the upcoming new Galaxy Note 10 is getting the same type of massive redesign that the Galaxy S10 got earlier this year, and now a new series of leaks may confirm Samsung's new design... or should we say, "designs."That's right, Samsung fans: for the first time ever, it appears as though Samsung will release not one but two different Galaxy Note phones. Just as Samsung followed Apple's lead with the Galaxy S10 series and added a (slightly) less expensive entry-level model, the Note 10 will seemingly have an entry-level model as well. This time around, the "Galaxy Note 10" will have slightly less impressive specs and a slightly lower price point, while the "Galaxy Note 10 Pro" will be the ultra high-end model with upgraded features and a price tag that's sure to make you cringe. An earlier report suggested that the Note 10 Pro model could start as high as $1,200 for the lowest amount of built-in storage.We've seen digital renders of both the Galaxy Note 10 and Galaxy Note 10 Pro already, and they came from Twitter user @OnLeaks, a source who regularly posts accurate renders of unreleased smartphones since the drawings are based on actual design files taken from the factory where these phones are manufactured. Here's a quick refresher that was posted last week:If previous leaks haven't been enough to convince you that this is what the upcoming Galaxy Note 10 and Galaxy Note 10 Pro will look like, we now have another set of leaks that further confirm the designs. A Twitter user named Sudhanshu Ambhore has posted photos of smartphone cases in the past that turned out to accurately depict the designs of unreleased smartphones. Now, he's back with two more cases.First, we have a case designed for the Galaxy Note 10, pictured first on its own and then a second time with a render of the Note 10 behind it.https://twitter.com/Sudhanshu1414/status/1139943092251795456Then, in a separate post on Twitter, we can see a Galaxy Note 10 Pro case from four different angles.https://twitter.com/Sudhanshu1414/status/1139942454122041345Samsung isn't expected to announce the Galaxy Note 10 or the Galaxy Note 10 Pro until sometime in early August, but don't expect the new design to be much of a surprise when the new phones are finally unveiled.


Japan protests Chinese activity near disputed islands

Mon, 06/17/2019 - 06:54

Japan protests Chinese activity near disputed islandsJapan has protested what is says was an unauthorized Chinese maritime survey within its economic waters near disputed East China Sea islands, officials said Monday. Japan's Foreign Ministry said it lodged a protest with Beijing after a Chinese maritime research ship was seen dropping a wire-like object into the water off the northwestern coast of Japanese-controlled Senkaku islands on Sunday. China also claims the islands, which it calls Diaoyu.


John Oliver Makes the Case for Impeachment on Last Week Tonight

Mon, 06/17/2019 - 06:48

John Oliver Makes the Case for Impeachment on Last Week Tonight“Not opening an inquiry comes with consequences, too," says Oliver.


Travel influencers detail 'dangerous' Dominican Republic experience, respond to backlash

Mon, 06/17/2019 - 06:28

Travel influencers detail 'dangerous' Dominican Republic experience, respond to backlashGreat Escape bloggers Cora and Jay Smith say they are speaking out again about her 2018 sexual assault in the Dominican Republic to warn others.


Iran Will Break Nuclear Deal's Uranium Stockpile Limit in 10 Days

Mon, 06/17/2019 - 06:21

Iran Will Break Nuclear Deal's Uranium Stockpile Limit in 10 DaysThe announcement puts more pressure on Europe to come up with new terms


Whoops — The U.S. Army Owns Potentially Hundreds of Thousands of Faulty Guns

Mon, 06/17/2019 - 05:55

Whoops — The U.S. Army Owns Potentially Hundreds of Thousands of Faulty GunsIt’s an inescapable reality that in big institutions, people will sometimes overlook memos and misplace equipment.But that’s cold comfort to the U.S. Army, which is struggling to select a new handgun while also dealing with the fallout from its last, controversial pistol choice.That’s right — overlooked memos and misplaced equipment.This first appeared in 2016.In August 2015, the ground combat branch inspected its Beretta M-9 pistols to make sure the guns had key safety fixes. The Army was supposed to have finished upgrading all the guns … more than two decades ago.“During a training exercise, a soldier was injured when a slide failure resulted in the rear portion of the slide separating from the receiver and struck him in the face,” an official warning explained.“‘WARNING’: DEATH OR SERIOUS INJURY TO SOLDIERS, OR DAMAGE TO ARMY EQUIPMENT WILL OCCUR IF THE INSTRUCTIONS IN THIS MESSAGE ARE NOT FOLLOWED.”


UK PM hopeful Stewart says he is on course for next stage of contest

Mon, 06/17/2019 - 05:53

UK PM hopeful Stewart says he is on course for next stage of contestRory Stewart, a contender to replace British Prime Minister Theresa May, said on Monday he believed he could get through to the next stage of the leadership contest if Conservative Party lawmakers follow through on their indications of support.


Vatican formally opens debate on married priests in Amazon

Mon, 06/17/2019 - 05:38

Vatican formally opens debate on married priests in AmazonThe Vatican formally opened debate Monday on letting married men be ordained as priests in remote parts of the Amazon where priests are so few that Catholics can go weeks or months without attending a Mass. The call for study on the proposal was contained in the working document, released Monday, for an October meeting of South American bishops on the Amazon. The document, prepared by the Vatican based on input from the region, affirmed that celibacy is a gift for the Catholic Church.


Iran's Path to Negotiations With Trump's America

Mon, 06/17/2019 - 05:33

Iran's Path to Negotiations With Trump's AmericaIran’s Supreme Leader Ayatollah Khamenei told Japanese prime minister Shinzo Abe in Tehran that his country “will not negotiate under pressure.” His meeting with Abe was followed by new acts of sabotage against oil tankers in the Gulf of Oman, raising concerns of a full-blown conflict erupting. While the perpetrator is unknown, the United States and Iran are increasingly locked in a stalemate that neither can afford to live with. The potential still exists for negotiations, provided President Donald Trump makes a course correction and offers credible incentives for a deal.A year after reneging on the Iran nuclear deal, President Trump’s so-called “maximum pressure” campaign against Tehran has crash-landed. Not only is the regime in Tehran still standing despite the expectations of senior Trump advisors, but Iranian leaders remain defiant in the face of Trump's calls for talks. This was reinforced by Khamenei during his meeting with Abe, with him saying that he does not trust the United States or believe that it seeks “genuine negotiations.”


Since When Are Liberals against Investigating the CIA and FBI?

Mon, 06/17/2019 - 05:30

Since When Are Liberals against Investigating the CIA and FBI?Was there ever a time when Americans had unquestioning faith in federal law-enforcement agencies? Maybe in the days before Vietnam and Watergate, most citizens did believe that those in charge of the nation’s fate could be trusted. Before World War II, the FBI’s formidable public-relations machine actually produced a popular radio and television program lauding its efforts “in peace and war.” After the war, when the CIA became the country’s first full-time foreign-intelligence agency, few Americans understood much about what it was doing, and what little they did know was colored by the government’s propaganda efforts.But ever since the upheaval of the late 1960s and early 1970s seemed to make cynicism about government our new national pastime, the notion that the intelligence community is above politics has been as outdated as the adulation once accorded to J. Edgar Hoover. It’s in that context that we should understand the recent debate about whether it’s appropriate to scrutinize the CIA and FBI’s role in the origins of the Russia probe. Though Democrats are now treating criticism of federal law enforcement as beyond the pale, their newfound faith is every bit as partisan as Republicans’ newfound skepticism. A sober look at the history of the past few decades reveals that, to paraphrase Clausewitz, in Washington, intelligence has always been a matter of politics by other means.Attorney General William Barr’s decision to launch an investigation into the origins of the Russia investigation has caused some predicable anger among Democrats and other Trump-administration critics. This discomfort stems from what they regard as an attempt to flip the narrative from Trump’s alleged collusion with Russia to a dubious decision by the FBI to begin spying on the political opponents of Hillary Clinton and the Obama administration.Given the failure of the investigation led by Special Counsel Robert Mueller to prove the collusion allegations, Barr’s attempt to determine whether the unprecedented probe of a presidential campaign was an abuse of power seems reasonable. But Barr’s decision is a huge problem for Democrats who are hoping to pursue the impeachment of Trump by picking up the case that Mueller failed to make after two years of effort.So we saw CNN crime-and-justice reporter Shimon Prokupecz this week telling host Don Lemon that it is “troubling” that the Department of Justice is questioning the work of CIA agents. “You don't do this,” Prokupecz said. “The CIA kind of operates in their own world.” Indeed the CIA does, but that never stopped Democrats or the press from going all out to probe its activities as long as said activities were perceived to further their opponents’ political agenda.Prokupecz and the House Democrats who are rushing to the barricades to defend the actions of former CIA director John Brennan at the beginning of the Mueller probe are acting as if the agency’s reputation has never before been called into question. Some of them may be too young to have experienced the political ferment of the 1970s and’80s, in which congressional committees led by Democrats such as Frank Church and Otis Pike conducted far-reaching investigations that embarrassed the intelligence establishment. But surely they have some memory of the debates about intelligence after the 9/11 attacks and the heated run-up to George W. Bush’s Iraq War. The only difference between those episodes and this one is that the political parties have switched sides.In the past, it was Republicans defending the FBI and the CIA against Democrats’ charges that these agencies were out of control. But since the summer of 2016, when the intelligence establishment seemed to join forces to raise alarms about Russian meddling in the presidential election and, more important, to raise concerns about untrue allegations of Trump-campaign collusion in that meddling, Democrats have acted as if Langley and Quantico are beyond reproach.Once Trump started criticizing the intelligence agencies’ consensus about Russians’ election interference, and then after it became known that the FBI and CIA had begun probing his campaign in the summer of 2016, Democrats became unstinting in their defense of the agencies. By contrast, Republicans who had been stalwart CIA and FBI defenders suddenly became bitter critics, demanding transparency and sometimes floating the same sort of conspiracy theories about the intelligence community’s activities that used to be the province of the Left.Sensible people of either party will always seek to mix deference to the intelligence community’s mission, which often requires a fair degree of secrecy, with an understanding that all government officials and agencies must be kept on a tight leash lest they abuse the awesome power vested in them.To those who have followed past controversies involving the FBI and CIA, it should seem entirely plausible that some federal law-enforcement agents could let their distaste for Trump get the better of them. That Democrats no longer care and Republicans suddenly do testifies to the fact that in Washington, most things always boil down to politics.


Huawei phone sales plunge, cutbacks planned as US pressure bites

Mon, 06/17/2019 - 05:14

Huawei phone sales plunge, cutbacks planned as US pressure bitesHuawei's founder said Monday the Chinese telecom giant's overseas smartphone sales have tumbled since the US last month threatened to blacklist the company, and he warned the embattled firm would slash production to weather the US drive to isolate it. The announcements by Huawei founder and CEO Ren Zhengfei marked the first clear indication from the company of the impact of the US pressure, which is being applied over concerns in Washington that Huawei is in bed with China's security apparatus. Speaking at a panel discussion organised by the company at headquarters in the city of Shenzhen in southern China, Ren was asked if he could confirm media reports citing anonymous sources which said its overseas smartphone sales had fallen by up to 40 percent.


June deals: How, where to get free food – doughnuts, tacos and more – and discounts

Mon, 06/17/2019 - 05:00

 How, where to get free food – doughnuts, tacos and more – and discountsKrispy Kreme has announced a new Original Filled doughnut and a way to try it for free Saturday as part of its National Donut Day challenge.


Sex cult trial in New York moves to closing arguments on Monday

Mon, 06/17/2019 - 05:00

Sex cult trial in New York moves to closing arguments on MondayJurors are expected to hear closing arguments on Monday in the trial of Keith Raniere, the New York man accused of trapping women in a sex cult and having them branded with his initials. Prosecutors said he used his organization Nxivm, which billed itself as a self-help group, to hide a secretive sorority known as DOS in which young women were blackmailed into have sex with him, follow dangerously restrictive diets and be branded with his initials. Raniere, who could face life in prison if convicted, has pleaded not guilty.


Buttigieg: There's Definitely Been Gay Presidents Before

Mon, 06/17/2019 - 04:58

 There's Definitely Been Gay Presidents BeforeReuters / John Sommers IIIf he wins in 2020, Pete Buttigieg is pretty sure he won't be the first gay president. Speaking to Axios on HBO, the South Bend mayor was asked how he's going to respond to people who attack him during the campaign for being too young, too liberal, or too gay to be the American president. “We have had excellent presidents who have been young,” he said. “We have had excellent presidents who have been liberal. I would imagine we've probably had excellent presidents who were gay—we just didn't know which ones.” He went on to say that it was statistically “almost certain” that there had been gay presidents, but he couldn't name names. “My gaydar even doesn't work that well in the present, let alone retroactively,” he lamented.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


In historic shift, Vatican to consider married priests for Amazon region

Mon, 06/17/2019 - 04:31

In historic shift, Vatican to consider married priests for Amazon regionA Vatican document on Monday said the Church should consider ordaining older married men as priests in remote areas of the Amazon, a historic shift which some say could pave the way for their use in other areas where clergy are scarce. The recommendation, contained in a working document prepared by the Vatican for a synod of bishops from the Amazon scheduled for October, also called for some kind of "official ministry" for women in the area, although it did not elaborate. It was the most direct mention ever in a Vatican document of the possibility of a married priesthood, albeit limited, and a greater ministerial role for women in one area of the world.


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