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Smiling cops take selfie near where dead baby was just found. Missouri city apologizes

Sat, 08/17/2019 - 07:09

Smiling cops take selfie near where dead baby was just found. Missouri city apologizes“The photos were by no means meant to take away from the extremely serious nature of the incident,” city officials say.


Unprecedented heatwave 'kills thousands of fish' in Alaska

Sat, 08/17/2019 - 06:52

Unprecedented heatwave 'kills thousands of fish' in AlaskaClimate change and warming rivers may have caused the mass death of salmon in parts of Alaska, scientists say.Large numbers of salmon died prematurely in some Alaskan rivers in July according to local reports, and scientists believe the cause could be the unprecedented heatwave that gripped the state last month.“Climate change is here in Alaska. We are seeing it. We are feeling it. And our salmon are dying because of it,” said Stephanie Quinn-Davidson, a biologist specialising in salmon and the director of the Yukon Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, in a Facebook post.> 200 miles of river. Dead chum consistently along entire stretch. None had spawned. 850 counted, many more missed. Likely ruled out mining, disease/parasites. All signs point to heat stress. Sad to see. Hoping this is not the new normal. climatechange salmon yukonriver alaska pic.twitter.com/zAHWSgy3pg> > — Steph Quinn-Davidson (@SalmonStephAK) > > July 29, 2019


Bill Maher Mocks Fox News’ Sean Hannity For Claiming He’s Causing a Recession

Sat, 08/17/2019 - 06:20

Bill Maher Mocks Fox News’ Sean Hannity For Claiming He’s Causing a RecessionHBOLast week on Real Time, host Bill Maher devoted the lion’s share of his opening monologue to President Trump’s bizarre hospital visit in El Paso, Texas, where none of the mass-shooting victims treated there wished to meet with him. He also focused on Tucker Carlson’s divorced-from-reality claim that white supremacy is a “hoax.”On Friday night, the comedian sank his teeth into Trump once more, this time focusing on a jab the president threw at the HBO host during a recent rally in Pittsburgh. “You have one guy on television: ‘I’m telling you he's not leaving—he’s going to win and then he’s not leaving, so in 2024, he won’t leave, I’m telling you.’ This is a serious person,” Trump said on Tuesday. “These people have gone stone cold crazy.” The comment came on the heels of Trump tweeting the following about Maher:Cue Maher: “Trump has been tweeting about me and talking about me at his rallies, so my anxiety level is very high. I’m hoping he’ll get distracted by his new plan—I’m not making this up—he wants to buy Greenland… and name it ‘New Ivanka.’”Yes, the news broke this week that Trump had apparently asked his aides if the country of Greenland could be purchased by the U.S.“He had two Nuremberg rallies this week, and the highlight for me is at the one last night, he told a protester, ‘You have a weight problem!’ That’s like mocking virgins at Comic-Con, isn’t it?” cracked Maher. (It later emerged that it wasn’t a protester at all but rather a supporter.) Maher also unpacked the perilous state of the U.S. economy, which may be headed toward a recession. “Trump, the financial genius, is driving the economy over the cliff,” Maher explained. “His new slogan is: Make America Atlantic City Again. Did you see what happened in the stock market this week? I spent more time gasping for breath than Jeffrey Epstein.” Bill Maher Exposes Fox News’ Tucker Carlson For Claiming White Supremacy Is a ‘Hoax’Later on during the panel portion, where he was joined by The Daily Beast’s Betsy Woodruff and Rick Wilson, Maher defended his position of wishing for a recession to get rid of Trump. “I’ve been saying for about two years that I hope we have a recession, and people get mad at me. Sean Hannity thinks I’m actually causing a recession. I do not have this power but he seems to be wanting to blame it on me, like I’m a genie and could make this happen,” said Maher, before pivoting to Trump’s anti-environment moves, including rolling back the Endangered Species Act. “[Recessions] don’t last forever. You know what lasts forever? Wiping out species—and people.”  What Maher seemed to conveniently overlook is how an economic recession would wipe out many, many people. Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


The Bogus Story That Launched a ‘Collusion’ Probe

Sat, 08/17/2019 - 05:30

The Bogus Story That Launched a ‘Collusion’ ProbeEditor’s note: Andrew C. McCarthy’s new book is Ball of Collusion: The Plot to Rig an Election and Destroy a Presidency. This is the fourth in a series of excerpts; the first can be read here, the second here, and the third here.The George Papadopoulos Origin Story has never added up. It has been portrayed as the Big Bang, the Magic Moment that started the FBI’s investigation of “collusion” -- a suspected election-theft conspiracy between Donald Trump’s campaign and Vladimir Putin’s regime. But if the young energy-sector analyst had actually emerged in early 2016 as the key to proving Trump–Russia espionage, you would think the FBI might have gotten around to interviewing him before January 27, 2017 — i.e., a week after President Trump had been inaugurated, and six months after the Bureau formally opened its “Crossfire Hurricane” probe.You would probably also think Papadopoulos, Suspect One in The Great Cyber Espionage Attack on Our Democracy, might have rated a tad more than the whopping 14-day jail sentence a federal judge eventually imposed on him. You might even suppose that he’d have been charged with some seditious felony involving clandestine operations against his own country, instead of . . . yes . . . fibbing to the FBI about the date of a meeting.That, however, does not scratch the surface. We are to believe that what led to the opening of the FBI’s Trump–Russia investigation, and what therefore is the plinth of the collusion narrative, is a breakfast meeting at a London hotel on April 26, 2016, between Papadopoulos and Joseph Mifsud, a Maltese academic we are supposed to take for a clandestine Russian agent. We are to take Papadopoulos’s word for it that Mifsud claimed Russia possessed “dirt” on Hillary Clinton in the form of “thousands” of “emails of Clinton.” We are further to believe that “the professor” elaborated that, in order to help Donald Trump’s candidacy, the Kremlin would release these “emails of Clinton” at a time chosen to do maximum damage to the Democratic nominee’s campaign.The story is based on no credible evidence. If it were ever presented to a jury, it would be laughed out of court.The Papadopoulos “collusion” claims (without collusion charges) are alleged in the Mueller report, which essentially repeats the grandiose “Statement of the Offense” that the special counsel included with the comparatively minor false-statement charge to which Papadopoulos pled guilty. Carefully parsed, this narrative stops short of alleging that the Trump adviser actually collaborated with a Russian agent. Rather, it claims that Papadopoulos engaged in a lot of twaddle with Mifsud, who he had reason to suspect might be a Russian agent. The pair brainstormed endlessly about potential high-level Trump-campaign meetings with the Putin regime, including [insert heavy breathing here] between Trump and Putin themselves. Papadopoulos then exaggerated these meanderings in emails to Trump-campaign superiors he was hot to impress.It is virtually certain that Mifsud was not a Russian agent. Whether he was an asset for any intelligence service, we cannot say with certainty at this point. But we can say that he had close contacts of significance with British intelligence, and with other Western governments.As Lee Smith relates, Mifsud has also long been associated with Claire Smith, a prominent British diplomat who served for years on Britain’s Joint Intelligence Committee, which answers directly to the prime minister. Ms. Smith was also a member of the United Kingdom’s Security Vetting Appeals Panel, which reviews denials of security clearances to government employees. During her career in the British foreign service, Smith worked with Mifsud at three different academic institutions: the London Academy of Diplomacy (which trained diplomats and government officials, some of them sponsored by the U.K.’s Foreign and Commonwealth Office, the British Council, or by their own governments), the University of Stirling, in Scotland, and Link Campus University in Rome, where Mifsud first met Papadopoulos. The campus is a well-known draw for diplomats and intelligence officials — the CIA holds conferences there, the FBI holds agent-training sessions there, and former U.S. intelligence officials teach there.In Rome on March 14, Papadopoulos met Joseph Mifsud. Twice Papadopoulos’s age, the Maltese professor gravitated to his fellow Link University lecturers and professors, who, as Lee Smith notes, “include senior Western diplomats and intelligence officials from a number of NATO countries, especially Italy and the United Kingdom.” Mifsud also taught at the University of Stirling and the London Academy of Diplomacy. That is to say, if Mifsud had actually been a Russian agent, he was situated to be one of the most successful in history.Not likely.Mifsud was a shameless self-promoter (at least until Russiagate notoriety sent him underground). He traveled frequently, including to Russia, where he participated in academic conferences and claimed acquaintance with regime officials — though how well he actually knows anyone of significance is unclear. In sum, Mifsud is the aging academic version of Papadopoulos. Thierry Pastor, a French political analyst who (with a Swiss-German lawyer named Stephan Roh) co-wrote a book about l’affaire Papadopoulos, made this observation about Mifsud’s brag that he knew Russian foreign minister Sergey Lavrov: “Yes, he met Lavrov. He met him once or twice in a large group. He knows Lavrov, but Lavrov doesn’t know Joseph. [Mifsud’s] contacts in Russia are with academics.”Nevertheless, the Trump–Russia narrative holds that Mifsud actually is a well-placed Russian agent who became interested in Papadopoulos upon discovering that he was a key (yup . . .) Trump adviser. According to this story, Mifsud introduced the younger man to a woman presented as Vladimir Putin’s niece. The professor also hooked Papadopoulos up with Ivan Timofeev, whom prosecutors pregnantly described as “the Russian MFA connection” (as in the Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs — Lavrov’s office) when they eventually charged Papadopoulos with making false statements. Timofeev and Papadopoulos had fevered discussions about setting up a Putin–Trump meeting in Russia. Finally, at their April 26 breakfast in London, Mifsud let slip that Russia had “dirt” on Hillary Clinton in the form of “thousands” of “emails of Clinton” — which, the narrative holds, must have been a reference to the DNC emails that Russian intelligence hacked and WikiLeaks disseminated during the Democratic party’s convention in July.The story is bogus through and through. There is no proof that Mifsud is a Russian agent — Mueller never alleged such a thing, either when Papadopoulos was charged or in the special counsel’s final report, which concluded that there was no Trump–Russia conspiracy. The woman in question was not Putin’s niece; she was eventually identified as Olga Polonskaya, the 32-year-old manager of a St. Petersburg wine company, who (the Mueller report suggests, based on a “Baby, thank you” email) may have been romantically involved with Mifsud. Timofeev is actually a young academic researcher who runs a Russian think tank, the Russian International Affairs Council. The RIAC has some sort of tie to the MFA, but no discernible connections to Russian intelligence. Like Mifsud, Timofeev is an academic; he was in an even less likely position to schedule a meeting for Putin than Papadopoulos was to do so for Trump. The hypothetical Putin–Trump summit was an inchoate idea that senior Trump officials shot down even as Papadopoulos and Timofeev were dreaming it up.What about those “emails of Clinton”? Other than the word of Papadopoulos, a convicted liar and palpably unreliable raconteur, there is no evidence — none — that Mifsud told him about emails. The professor never showed him any emails. And in his February 2017 FBI interview, Mifsud denied saying anything to Papadopoulos about Clinton-related emails in the possession of the Kremlin. Of course, Mifsud could be lying. But there is no evidence that he would have been in a position to know the inner workings of Russian intelligence operations.It is not enough to say that Mueller never charged Mifsud with lying to the FBI. In Mueller’s report, when prosecutors have evidence that Mifsud gave inaccurate information, they say so. For example, they allege that Mifsud “falsely” recounted the last time he had seen Papadopoulos. But Mueller never alleges that Mifsud’s denial of knowledge about Russia’s possession of emails is false. And if we learned anything from Mueller’s investigation, it is that he knows how to make a false-statements case.In any event, Mifsud’s supposed comment about Clinton’s emails obviously made little impression on Papadopoulos. The day after he met the professor, Papadopoulos sent two emails to high-ranking Trump-campaign officials about his meeting with Mifsud. In neither did he mention emails. Papadopoulos instead focused on the possibility — far-fetched, but apparently real to Papadopoulos — that Mifsud could help arrange a meeting between Trump and Putin. Prior to being interviewed by the FBI in January 2017, Papadopoulos never reported anything about Russia’s having emails — neither to his Trump-campaign superiors, to whom he was constantly reporting on his conversations with Mifsud, nor to Alexander Downer, the Australian diplomat whose conversation with Papadopoulos was the proximate cause for the formal opening of the FBI probe.It was only when he was interviewed by the FBI in late January 2017, nine months after his conversation with Mifsud, that Papadopoulos is alleged to have claimed that Mifsud said the Russians had “thousands” of “emails of Clinton.” There is no known recording of this FBI interview, so there is no way of knowing whether (a) Papadopoulos volunteered this claim that Mifsud mentioned emails or (b) the email claim was suggested to Papadopoulos by his interrogators’ questions. We have no way of knowing if Papadopoulos is telling the truth (and therefore hid the possibility of damaging Clinton emails from his Trump-campaign superiors for no fathomable reason) or if he was telling the FBI agents what he thought they wanted to hear (which is what he often did when reporting to the Trump campaign).Is the Mifsud–Papadopoulos connection a case of Western intelligence agencies entrapping the Trump campaign by first using an “asset” (Mifsud) to plant a damning “Russia helping Trump” story with Papadopoulos, and later using another “asset” (Stefan Halper) to try to get Papadopoulos to repeat that story so that “collusion” could be proved?At this point, we don’t know. Here is what we do know: The United States government has never charged Joseph Mifsud. It has never accused him of being an agent of Russia. It took no steps to arrest him despite opportunities to do so. In fact, the FBI interviewed Mifsud and, when he denied Papadopoulos’s claim that he had told the young Trump adviser that Russia had Hillary emails, the Bureau let him go. Special Counsel Mueller never alleged that Mifsud’s denial was a false statement.That’s a pretty a curious way to treat the “Russian agent” who was the rationale for the incumbent administration’s use of foreign counterintelligence powers to investigate the presidential campaign of its political opposition, no?


White supremacy-fuelled killings to be classed as domestic terrorism under new law proposed in New York

Sat, 08/17/2019 - 04:37

White supremacy-fuelled killings to be classed as domestic terrorism under new law proposed in New YorkAmid a national debate about racism, extremism and mass shootings, governor Andrew Cuomo proposed to make New York the first state to classify “hate-fuelled” killings as domestic terrorism on Thursday.Democrat Mr Cuomo unveiled the proposal almost two weeks after the back-to-back massacres in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, prompted all-too-familiar cries for action from both political parties.Describing the need to address the “new violent epidemic” of “hate-fuelled, American-on-American terrorism,” Mr Cuomo called for raising the penalties for violence motivated by race, gender, sexual orientation or other protected classes by making them punishable by up to life in prison without parole.“Today, our people are three times more likely to suffer a terrorist attack launched by an American than one launched by a foreigner,” he said. “Now this is not just repulsive. This is not just immoral. This is not just anti-American. It is illegal."And we must confront it by enacting a new law to fit the crime.”While the governor’s office has not shared any bill language, it said mass casualties would be defined as any death of at least one person and the attempted murder of at least two more.Lawmakers have wrestled with how to define and prosecute domestic terrorism for years.There is no federal crime of domestic terrorism. While congress passed a law after the 9/11 attacks defining domestic terrorism as violent acts intended to intimidate civilians or the government, that law did not create an accompanying federal offence, such as exists for international terrorism.Acts of domestic terrorism have instead been prosecuted under different charges, such as attempting to “destroy a building in interstate commerce”.Dozens of states, including New York, have enacted state-level laws defining terrorism. Some, including Georgia and Vermont, explicitly mention domestic terrorism.But those laws, like the federal one, largely measure terrorism as an attempt to coerce or destabilise the public or the government.New York’s new law, by contrast, would specify that domestic terrorism included acts of mass violence against people for their identities.“White supremacists, anti-Semites, anti-LGBTQ, white nationalists: these are Americans committing mass hate crimes against other Americans,” Mr Cuomo said. “And it should be recognised for what it is: domestic terrorism.”The governor also called on congress to enact a new federal domestic terrorism law. Senator Martha McSally introduced a bill on Wednesday to do that.Brooklyn congressman Hakeem Jeffries, a Democrat who also spoke at the event at the New York City Bar Association, joined the call for federal action. “Rome is burning right now, and yet Donald Trump and his co-conspirators in the Republican Party are fiddling around,” he said.Mr Cuomo’s proposal appears well positioned to win support in the state legislature, which this year fell under Democratic control for the first time in nearly a decade.While leaders of both the state Senate and Assembly did not explicitly say that they would back the bill, in statements they said they shared Mr Cuomo’s goal of ensuring safety and condemning hate.Mary McCord, a former top national security official in the justice department, said states’ existing domestic terrorism laws have not proved very effective, in part because they do little to address crime prevention.“They kind of just sit there unused, because they don’t necessarily have the same experience in investigating and prosecuting terrorism cases” as federal authorities, she said. “I think all states should have domestic terrorism statutes, it’s a good thing for them to have, but it hasn’t really moved the ball significantly.”Brian Michael Jenkins, a senior researcher at the RAND Corporation think tank, said that murder typically already carries the maximum penalties, whatever the motivation.“A mass murderer with a manifesto is still a mass murderer,” Jenkins said.Supporters of Mr Cuomo’s proposal said that singling out political motivation was, in part, the point.Malcolm Hoenlein, the executive vice chair of the Conference of Presidents of Major American Jewish Organisations, appeared at Thursday’s speech alongside Mr Cuomo. He urged the audience to remember that “words are important”.“If you don’t name it, you can’t fight it," he said. The New York Times


The White House quietly appointed a new China director who could rattle Beijing and make a US-China trade deal even less likely

Sat, 08/17/2019 - 02:44

The White House quietly appointed a new China director who could rattle Beijing and make a US-China trade deal even less likelyThe National Security Council has hired Elnigar Iltebir, a Uighur-American, to direct its China policy. Uighurs face severe oppression in China.


U.S. issues warrant to seize Iran oil tanker 'Grace 1' after Gibraltar judge orders its release

Sat, 08/17/2019 - 02:37

U.S. issues warrant to seize Iran oil tanker 'Grace 1' after Gibraltar judge orders its releaseThe U.S. Justice Department issued a warrant to seize an Iran oil tanker detained in Gibraltar, a day after a judge ordered the release of 'Grace 1.'


'A new Hawaiian Renaissance': how a telescope protest became a movement

Sat, 08/17/2019 - 00:30

 how a telescope protest became a movementDemonstrators opposed to the building of a telescope on Mauna Kea, the state’s highest peak, have forged a communityThe actor Jason Momoa exchanges a traditional greeting with an elder while visiting protesters last month. Photograph: Hollyn Johnson/APOn Hawaii’s Big Island, a protest against a $1.4bn observatory on Mauna Kea, a mountain considered sacred by many Native Hawaiians, is entering a second month. In that time, the protest site has swelled from a few hundred to several thousands, attracted celebrity visitors, and built a community of Native Hawaiians who see it as a pivotal moment.The protest site sits at an elevation of 6,632ft, where the cold wind whips across hardened lava fields. But amid this inhospitable environment, weeks of demonstration have given rise to a sense of permanence.The site stretches across a two-lane highway, where trucks flying a Native Hawaiian flag and the upside-down state flag line both sides of the road. A “Kūpuna tent”, where the elders of the community gather, is strategically placed to block an access road up the mountain in order to stop construction vehicles from reaching the summit.New arrivals are encouraged to sign in at an orientation station. There is a tented cafeteria providing free meals, and a community-run medic station, daycare and school. Along the barren roadside, tropical flowers have been casually stuck in traffic cones. People pound taro, a Hawaiian crop, in the traditional way on wooden boards to make poi, a local dish.The protest stems from controversy over the fate of Mauna Kea, the tallest peak in Hawaii and the proposed site of an enormous observatory known as the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). The summit, 13,796ft above sea level, is said to be an ideal location to look into deep space. TMT is expected to capture images ‘that look back to the beginning of the universe. Protesters, who call themselves kia‘i, or “protectors”, argue the construction will further desecrate Mauna Kea, which is already home to about a dozen telescopes.The sun sets behind telescopes at the summit of Mauna Kea in Hawaii. Photograph: Caleb Jones/APKealoha Pisciotta, one of the protest leaders and a spokesperson for Mauna Kea Anaina Hou, a Native Hawaiian group, says the movement is “pushing back on corporate culture” through Hawaiian concepts of “Kapu Aloha”, which emphasizes compassionate responses, especially towards opponents, and “Aloha ʻĀina”, a saying that translates to “love of the land”.“We are just joining the world’s indigenous movements,” Pisciotta says. “We need Kapu Aloha ... to bring back the balance from the insanity and destruction of our earth.”Pisciotta said that the protesters were showing the world a way “to really live differently” while protecting the land.“For Native Hawaiians, there is a question of our right to self-determination as defined by international law, but I think it’s so much bigger than that,” said Pisciotta. “It’s about us learning to live and be interdependent.” Why are the protests happening?Protesters continue their vigil, on 19 July. Photograph: Bruce Asato/APHawaiians consider Mauna Kea sacred for numerous reasons. The mountain is known as the home to Wākea, the sky god, who partnered with Papahānaumoku, the earth goddess. Protesters hope to protect and help restore the native ecosystem on Mauna Kea.But the protests are also part of a legacy for Native Hawaiians that goes back to 1893, when the Hawaiian Kingdom was overthrown. Hawaiians lost their land as well as their culture, as the latter was suppressed through law and religion. It wasn’t until the 1970s, during a period of cultural flourishing known as the Hawaiian Renaissance, that the Hawaiian language was allowed to be spoken in school and that the hula was revived.The period was defined by its own resistance movement, as activists focused on stopping the US military from using Kahoʻolawe, one of the eight main Hawaiian Islands, as a target for bombing practice. After more than a decade of peaceful protests and occupations of the island, the US government ended the live-fire training in the 1990s.Some see the latest protest action as a new Hawaiian Renaissance. Days are punctuated by the blowing of the conch shell to announce ceremonies that include chanting, hula, and hoʻokupu (offerings). Several celebrities with Hawaii ties have travelled here to participate, including Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, Jason Momoa, and Jack Johnson.Hawaii’s governor, David Ige, right, watches a performance during a visit to the ninth day of protests against the Thirty Meter Telescope, on 23 July. Photograph: Jamm Aquino/AP“The atmosphere here is incredible. We’re all here protecting our ʻāina [land]”, said Kamuela Park, a protester at the site. He added that it had been “awesome to see people from all spectrums coming here in support”.Peaceful demonstrators have faced one major confrontation with police. Three days into the protest, 38 kūpuna (revered elders) were arrested for blocking the road that leads to the construction site. That same day, Hawaii’s governor, David Ige, signed an emergency proclamation giving law enforcement more control over the area and allowed them to bring in National Guard troops. Images of the elderly being arrested quickly spread, garnering sympathy for the movement and attracting more people to the site. What comes next?Demonstrators block a road at the base of Hawaii’s tallest mountain, on 15 July. Photograph: Caleb Jones/APNegotiations between government officials and protesters have slowed since the arrests. On 30 July, the governor rescinded his emergency proclamation. He also extended the window during which construction could begin from 60 days to two years, meaning the protesters would theoretically need to block the road until September 2021.“I want to assure everyone that we are committed. Our law enforcement officers will remain at the site to ensure the safety of all of those involved,” said Ige at a press conference. “We continue to seek and find a peaceful solution to move this project forward.”While tensions may have eased, protesters have said they will stay until they stop TMT from being built. Demonstrators proved their endurance in early August as many of them stayed at the protest site while two consecutive storms passed by the islands.Pisciotta, who used to work at the Mauna Kea observatories as a telescope systems specialist, says the movement has been especially “huge” for young people.“Some of the elders, they lived through the time it was prohibited to speak the language,” she says. Now younger Hawaiians grow up speaking it in school and with strong cultural affiliations. Hawaiian youth who are camping out are helping to organize donations, teaching some of the courses at the community-led school, and spreading the word on social media.“In our philosophy, the land and the people are one,” said Pisciotta, about Aloha ʻĀina. “So it was a rallying point for the renaissance and now this is a kind of new renaissance.”


Portland, Oregon, awaits right-wing rally, counter protests

Fri, 08/16/2019 - 23:10

Portland, Oregon, awaits right-wing rally, counter protestsMore than two dozen local, state and federal law enforcement agencies, including the FBI and the Federal Protective Service, were in Portland, Oregon, on Saturday to help police there monitor a right-wing rally that's expected to draw demonstrators from around the U.S. Self-described anti-fascists have vowed to confront the rally while leaders from the far right urged their followers to turn out in large numbers to protest the arrests of six members of right-wing groups in the run-up to the event. In a video he livestreamed on Facebook, Gibson accused the police of playing politics by arresting him but not the masked demonstrators who beat up conservative blogger Andy Ngo at a June 29 rally that drew national attention to this small, liberal city.


Bullock tries to find middle ground on guns

Fri, 08/16/2019 - 23:09

Bullock tries to find middle ground on gunsAs a Democratic politician in deep-red Montana, Steve Bullock has long searched for a middle ground on guns. Now a presidential candidate in a party pushing hard for new gun-control laws, he still is. While many of his Democratic opponents go all-in on new proposals for restricting guns, responding to the latest string of mass shootings, Bullock is the rare voice of caution warning Democrats about going too far.


Argentina detains businessman at center of Mexican corruption scandal

Fri, 08/16/2019 - 22:40

Argentina detains businessman at center of Mexican corruption scandalArgentine authorities and Interpol detained on Friday a businessman who was at the center of a Mexican corruption scandal in 2004 that hurt the reputation of Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, who at the time was Mexico City's mayor and is now the nation's president. The detained Argentine businessman Carlos Ahumada was filmed in 2004 giving bundles of money to Lopez Obrador's main ally in the City Council, Rene Bejarano. Support for Lopez Obrador at the time was battered by the graft scandal.


Mexico is busing asylum-seeking migrants to southern border

Fri, 08/16/2019 - 22:17

Mexico is busing asylum-seeking migrants to southern borderThe Mexican government said Friday it is busing migrants who have applied for asylum in the United States to the southern Mexico state of Chiapas. About 30,000 migrants have been sent back to northern Mexican border cities to await U.S. asylum hearings under a policy known as "Remain in Mexico" under which they have to wait for hearings months away.


Dale Earnhardt Jr.'s plane 'bounced' before catching fire, FAA accident report says

Fri, 08/16/2019 - 22:03

Dale Earnhardt Jr.'s plane 'bounced' before catching fire, FAA accident report saysDale Earnhardt Jr.'s plane 'bounced' as part of a hard landing, according to a Federal Aviation Administration accident report.


Google employees call for tech giant to not work with ICE, Customs and Border Protection

Fri, 08/16/2019 - 22:01

Google employees call for tech giant to not work with ICE, Customs and Border ProtectionReaction from National Border Patrol Council president Brandon Judd and former acting ICE director Tom Homan.


China flexes muscle near Hong Kong amid more weekend rallies

Fri, 08/16/2019 - 19:54

China flexes muscle near Hong Kong amid more weekend ralliesMembers of China's paramilitary People's Armed Police marched and practiced crowd control tactics at a sports complex in Shenzhen across from Hong Kong in what some interpreted as a threat against pro-democracy protesters in the semi-autonomous territory. A stadium security guard said "it wasn't clear" when the paramilitary police would leave the grounds.


Obama told Biden advisers not to let the former Veep ‘damage his legacy’ in his 2020 presidential run

Fri, 08/16/2019 - 19:51

Obama told Biden advisers not to let the former Veep ‘damage his legacy’ in his 2020 presidential runObama is reportedly concerned that Biden is relying on advisers who are "too old and out of touch with the current political climate,"


The Latest: Reporter ID'd in New Orleans small plane crash

Fri, 08/16/2019 - 19:30

 Reporter ID'd in New Orleans small plane crashA New Orleans TV journalist and the pilot of a small plane are dead after their aircraft went down in a field near a city airport. WVUE-TV confirms that Nancy Parker, a reporter and anchor at the television station for 23 years, was killed in the crash Friday afternoon near Lakefront Airport. A Federal Aviation Administration statement says the plane was a 1983 Pitts S-2B aircraft that it crashed about a half mile south of the airport under unknown circumstances.


US lawmaker Tlaib scraps West Bank trip over Israeli demands

Fri, 08/16/2019 - 19:07

US lawmaker Tlaib scraps West Bank trip over Israeli demandsPalestinian-American lawmaker Rashida Tlaib on Friday turned down Israel's offer to let her visit her grandmother in the occupied West Bank, owing to restrictions she termed oppressive. It was the latest twist in a saga hinging on Israel's war against those who would boycott it over its treatment of the Palestinians. On Thursday, Israel barred from entry the US Congress' first Muslim female lawmakers, Tlaib and Ilhan Omar, on the grounds that they support the boycott movement, and after President Donald Trump urged the Jewish state to block the two Democrats.


Cal Fire said Tubbs Fire wasn’t caused by PG&E. Victims win the right to sue utility anyway

Fri, 08/16/2019 - 19:00

Cal Fire said Tubbs Fire wasn’t caused by PG&E. Victims win the right to sue utility anywayVictims of the deadly Tubbs Fire in 2017 won the right to pursue lawsuits against PG&E; Corp. on Friday in spite of state investigators’ declaration that the utility wasn’t to blame for the fire.


'A complete setup': Trump criticizes Tlaib for declining Israel's approval to see elderly grandmother

Fri, 08/16/2019 - 18:57

 Trump criticizes Tlaib for declining Israel's approval to see elderly grandmotherCiting "racist treatment" and "oppressive conditions," Rep. Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., who is of Palestinian descent said she will not be going to the West Bank to visit her grandmother even though Israel relented and granted her travel request on humanitarian grounds.


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